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Almost every trip, for anyone, whether for work or pleasure, takes some planning and preparation. For people with many types of disabilities and medical conditions, trips may take much more care in the areas of planning and preparation in order to have a successful time. Here are five top tips that should be taken into consideration when preparing to travel.

Packing

Everyone needs to pack ahead. However, for people with disabilities and medical conditions, underwear and deodorant are not the worst things to forget. Many different medical supplies are extremely difficult or impossible to obtain as they are not over-the-counter. One typically needs a prescription for these items and these supplies are often delivered to one’s home. Chargers for assistive technologies are important and should not be forgotten as well; an inoperable assistive device could end one’s travel plans. 

Pack snacks and extra water as well. This is an important recommendation for anyone, not just travels with disabilities.  

Lodging

Booking lodging online–whether a chain hotel or shared economy space–has become widely popular. Never-the-less, accessibility options are not always provided nor always correct/complete online. One example, that may add to your packing preparation, is a shower chair. Not every lodging facility offers a shower chair and even if there is one provided, it may not work for you. If you have a particular shower chair that you need, take it with you. 

When booking any type of lodging, it is important to call ahead and speak with a real person to get the best possible result. When in doubt, book with a different place. In the end, remember that when it comes to accessibility, not all hotels and shared economy locations know what they have to offer. 

Research Destinations 

There are generally two types of travelers, one who plans and researches and one who travels on a whim. When it comes to having a disability or medical condition, traveling on a whim is typically going to be more of an adventure than one wants and will possibly end in great frustration–more so than for the traveler without a disability. Be sure to research restaurants and other possible locations to ensure their accessibility. Find in-network hospitals and pharmacies before a possible emergency–in hopes that there is not one. Do your research but at the same time, understand that the more time put into researching does not guarantee a completely accessible trip.  

Parking Placards

Do you use an accessible parking placard? If so, it is important to know that not every state nor city honors accessible parking placards from other states. For example, New York City does not honor parking placards from the state of New York; travelers are able to park in a parking garage, however, one must have a New York City placard to park on a New York City street. In California, travelers must acquire a temporary traveler’s accessible parking placard in order to avoid fines while parking in an accessible spot. When on a road trip, check to be sure that the state(s) in which you plan to travel honors the placard that has been issued by your state. Here is an article about Disability Parking For Travelers that will get you started.

In many states, like California, parking in metered parking spots is free for people with accessible parking placards or plates. This may not go for every state and can even vary from city to city. In both Seattle and New York City, free metered street parking is limited to four hours. Check out the street parking policies for where you plan to travel. You may not have to pay for street parking. 

Peace of Mind

Depending on your destination location, traveler’s insurance and roadside assistance may both be a necessary investment. Medicaid does not cover medical expenses outside of one’s state and insurance plans do not cross country borders. No one expects the worst to happen but planning for exactly that can give every traveler peace of mind. Another safety net that can give every traveler on the road peace of mind is investing in roadside assistance. For people who use wheelchairs, Mobility Roadside Assistance (MRA) may just be the way to go. In the midst of your car breaking down, not only does MRA ensure that your car gets to where it needs to go but you and your chair arrive there as well. 

Almost every trip, for anyone, whether for work or pleasure, takes some planning and preparation. For people with many types of disabilities and medical conditions, trips may take much more care in the areas of planning and preparation in order to have a successful time. Here are five top tips that should be taken into consideration when preparing to travel.

Packing

Everyone needs to pack ahead. However, for people with disabilities and medical conditions, underwear and deodorant are not the worst things to forget. Many different medical supplies are extremely difficult or impossible to obtain as they are not over-the-counter. One typically needs a prescription for these items and these supplies are often delivered to one’s home. Chargers for assistive technologies are important and should not be forgotten as well; an inoperable assistive device could end one’s travel plans. 

Pack snacks and extra water as well. This is an important recommendation for anyone, not just travels with disabilities.  

Lodging

Booking lodging online–whether a chain hotel or shared economy space–has become widely popular. Never-the-less, accessibility options are not always provided nor always correct/complete online. One example, that may add to your packing preparation, is a shower chair. Not every lodging facility offers a shower chair and even if there is one provided, it may not work for you. If you have a particular shower chair that you need, take it with you. 

When booking any type of lodging, it is important to call ahead and speak with a real person to get the best possible result. When in doubt, book with a different place. In the end, remember that when it comes to accessibility, not all hotels and shared economy locations know what they have to offer. 

Research Destinations 

There are generally two types of travelers, one who plans and researches and one who travels on a whim. When it comes to having a disability or medical condition, traveling on a whim is typically going to be more of an adventure than one wants and will possibly end in great frustration–more so than for the traveler without a disability. Be sure to research restaurants and other possible locations to ensure their accessibility. Find in-network hospitals and pharmacies before a possible emergency–in hopes that there is not one. Do your research but at the same time, understand that the more time put into researching does not guarantee a completely accessible trip.  

Parking Placards

Do you use an accessible parking placard? If so, it is important to know that not every state nor city honors accessible parking placards from other states. For example, New York City does not honor parking placards from the state of New York; travelers are able to park in a parking garage, however, one must have a New York City placard to park on a New York City street. In California, travelers must acquire a temporary traveler’s accessible parking placard in order to avoid fines while parking in an accessible spot. When on a road trip, check to be sure that the state(s) in which you plan to travel honors the placard that has been issued by your state. Here is an article about Disability Parking For Travelers that will get you started.

In many states, like California, parking in metered parking spots is free for people with accessible parking placards or plates. This may not go for every state and can even vary from city to city. In both Seattle and New York City, free metered street parking is limited to four hours. Check out the street parking policies for where you plan to travel. You may not have to pay for street parking. 

Peace of Mind

Depending on your destination location, traveler’s insurance and roadside assistance may both be a necessary investment. Medicaid does not cover medical expenses outside of one’s state and insurance plans do not cross country borders. No one expects the worst to happen but planning for exactly that can give every traveler peace of mind. Another safety net that can give every traveler on the road peace of mind is investing in roadside assistance. For people who use wheelchairs, Mobility Roadside Assistance (MRA) may just be the way to go. In the midst of your car breaking down, not only does MRA ensure that your car gets to where it needs to go but you and your chair arrive there as well. 

All in all, road trips can be incredibly fun and educational. However, make sure to plan ahead so that your trip can also be memorable, but not due to the lack of access–a trip with great experiences, not one shadowed by the bumps encountered along the way.  

Start your trip planning with Mobility Roadside Assistance!

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